News, Radio

Live Updates: #SmokeMovemberTakeover

News, Radio

Live Updates: #SmokeMovemberTakeover

2 weeks ago
By Chloe Williams

Callum & Adam: Intro to Movember and the broadcast

  • Globally a man dies every minute to suicide
  • 75% of suicides in the uk are men
  • Interview with SABBS
    • Lama – mental health on campus; first aiders, counselling services; mentors having trainers. Partnering with the NHS so that we have adequate counselling. If you have any issues come to her.
    • Lareb – work for SU; President of the SU. Oversees all SABBS across campuses.
    • No day is the same; sometimes students come to talk, to start a campaign or to ask for guidance seeking facilities and services that could help them
    • They are voted into position; manifesto points – all SABBS agreed they wanted to work on mental health awareness.
      • Mental Health across all campuses; talk about it
    • Events in aid of Movember;
      • Poetry night, temporary tattoos, pens, men talking about their own experiences – hard hitting and meaningful – snowball effect where once one guy stood up and spoke about it, more felt confident to do so. Good outlet.
      • Calm can help and they’re always looking for volunteers
    • Don’t be afraid to share with people close to you; they’re here to support you.
    • Seek professional help when you know it’s necessary
    • Even if you don’t have close friends to talk to, SABBS are there.
    • Gerald – working closely with the mental health society, main SABB working with the Movember campaign.
      • Exhibition game
      • First event was at the undercroft – raised a lot of money; moustache Monday, glitter moustaches
      • If people want to get in contact, social media, contact cards in the forum. Reach out and he’ll get back to you.
      • Contact anyone in the SU and it will circulate to the SABBS who reach out to you
    • They aren’t professionals but they can sign post you to people who can help.
  • Interview with Chris Rolfe; head of SU
    • Supports SABB campaigns
    • Podcasts; getting people talking
    • Male coping mechanisms turn to negative ways – SU can help people to find other positive coping mechanisms
    • Not about making money; more about opening the conversation up
    • Student life can be difficult; it’s easy to spiral into negativity, you don’t tend to have as many people to talk to. This is when it’s really important to talk. Whether you’re first year or third year there’s always a different challenge to deal with.
    • SU exists as a body to support students; sport activities to help people meet others
    • They’re also there to listen, letting students know they can talk to other students as well as staff
    • Independence isn’t always a good thing; you don’t have to be independent in dealing with your mental health
    • Mental injuries should be treated the same as a physical injury.
    • It’s okay to make that first step because people are there to listen and won’t judge
    • More than happy to talk to anyone, drop an email chris.rolfe@westminster.ac.uk
  • Mystery Moustache game
    • Adam’s game where Callum has to listen to clips of famous people with iconic moustaches and guess who it belongs to If he gets 4 out of 6, he wins his favourite food – chocolate eclairs. If he loses, Adam gets to eat them.First voice; Freddie Mercury
      • Callum guessed on a whim but got it right after thinking it was David Bowie.
      Second voice; Hulk Hogan
      • Callum says he sounds tough and mean. He has no idea who this one is. Pass.
      Third voice; Bert Reynolds
      • Another pass
      Fourth Voice; Eddie Murphy
      • Correct; guessed it straight away.
      Fifth Voice; The Swedish Chef
      • “Who the heck is that?!” Pass.
      Sixth Voice; Lionel Richie
      • Correct although Callum can’t pronounce the name Lionel

Alex & Ryan: Mental Health in Sports

  • Talking about football and mental health
  • General talk about mental health in men across different sports
  • An interview with Hamish Reilly about how he uses gaming for his mental health
    • How he deals with juggling being in a band and his mental health and how gaming helps with that. Where his love for gaming started. How gaming can become too much of a comfort zone and can also hinder as well as help.
  • Ryan talks about his personal experience in football where he didn’t feel like he was part of a team when he would be blamed for not defending some goals. It impacted his mental health because he felt pressure.
  • Alex coached football at kids level and says sometimes the parents can add to the pressure in those circumstances. As a kid you want to impress your parents but it can be hard to process both the parents and managers calls as well as staying present in the game.

Stephen & Ginny: Mental health in the community & how to help yourself

  • How to get help, where you can go and who you can talk to
  • Interview with Jibran from mental health society
    • Raises awareness of mental health issues through social mediaTherapaws; therapy dogs to help relieve student stress for a little whileCreated temporary tattoos of empowering words to spread awareness; for example, ‘think positive’. Follow @uwsu_mentalhealthsoc on Instagram to find out more about their events.Talking about mental health is so important because not talking about struggles tends to result in a fatal way; we want to change that.
  • The university provides 6 counselling sessions for free, with further appointments available if the problem requires. Pulama interviewed Samira from the student counselling service.
  • There’s a stigma around mental health problems. Men may not want to put the burden on their friends and feel pressure to have to deal with it themselves.
  • The good thing about counselling is that it’s not your best friend, this person is impartial and you don’t have to worry about ‘burdening’ them with how you feel.
  • Pressures facing young men; lack of employment opportunities, juggling uni work and paid work, fear of failure and not succeeding, issues related to body image – young men are just as worried about their appearance as women.
  • Talking about your feelings is brave.
  • Men’s mental health forum – safe space online for men to discuss health issues. They do ‘man manuals’ which are little guides which address men’s health issues (menshealthforum.org.uk)

Joe & Jason: Mental Health in minorities

  • Interview with Lubaba about mental health in young black men
    • Event to let people share their stories
    • There’s a long way to go in fixing the problem however by starting the conversation about mental health in this minority and working with the university to make sure there are facilities and services provided for students.
    • There are large amount of students who have to wait a while to even be seen by university counsellors, so she’s working towards making this service stronger for students.
    • People from black minority groups are more likely to experience struggles with their mental health, more likely to keep it to themselves, more likely to commit suicide.
    • When we talk about men’s mental health, we need to ask why they’re less likely to get diagnosed. They may be more likely to be criminalised by the system and are taught to keep quiet.
    • Young black men’s experiences with racist teachers, police etc will obviously have an effect on their mental health so they struggle to see that these are also people who are there to help them. If the people on the top can’t relate to like black and other minorities, it’s gonna be harder for them to provide help. So maybe it’s the people on top that need to change their mindsets and see university students as more than just money.
  • Performance from the dance society specifically choreographed for this event
    • The dance society is open to anyone; some of them have been dancing for 10 years but the society is for beginners to advanced.
    • They still have places available for anyone who wants to join
    • They do contemporary and jazz as well as other dance styles
    • The dance was greatly inspired by pedestrian movement
    • Dance can be a very expressive form of release; you can communicate the emotions you may not be able to let out verbally.
    • You see people everyday and don’t know what they’re going through.
  • Dan interview; social media manager for LGBTi+
    • Try to do a lot for mental health in general
    • Mental health awareness month they shared some encouraging social media campaigns
    • Self love campaign in conjunction with Movember, post things you love about yourself; legs, how they appreciate the fact they are honest, give great hugs, personal attributes
    • It’s important to remember there’s more to you than what you look like
    • The good and bad of social media; teaches you to be vain but it’s easy to overlook the personal side of ourselves.
    • Instagram can reinforce negativity but at the same time there are many people out there providing positivity and it’s about accessing that positivity.
    • The society offers panel talks and events to try and get people to concentrate on the positives; whilst you do have to focus on the negatives sometimes, they try to put a positive spin on it.
  • Moustaches can either go really right or you could end up looking like Pedro from Napoleon Dynamite
  • Interview with Survivors UK
    • Charity provides support for sexual assault survivors
    • They have a campaign called #weseeyou to reinforce the notion that you are seen and you are valued, they also have #wehearyou because it is important to have your voice heard too
    • Creating more pathways with other organisations and institutions so there are enough services available for people to break through the barrier of feeling too nervous to talk about it
    • On average it takes 26 years for a man to speak up about being sexually abused. This is what Survivors UK are working to change.